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President Declares Disaster for WashingtonTuesday, August 12, 2014 - agrandon

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency announced that federal disaster aid has been made available to the State of Washington to supplement state, tribal and local recovery efforts in the area affected by wildfires during the period of July 9 to August 5, 2014.

The President's action makes federal funding available to state, tribal and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by the wildfires in the county of Okanogan and the Confederated Tribes of Colville Reservation.  

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.

Michael J. Hall has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area.  Hall said that damage surveys are continuing in other areas, and additional counties may be designated for assistance after the assessments are fully completed.

Following is a summary of key federal disaster aid programs that can be made available as needed and warranted under President Obama's disaster declaration issued for the State of Washington.

Assistance for the State, Tribal and Affected Local Governments Can Include as Required:

  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for debris removal and emergency protective measures, including direct federal assistance, taken to save lives and protect property and public health.  Emergency protective measures assistance is available to state, tribal and eligible local governments on a cost-sharing basis. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)
  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for repairing or replacing damaged public facilities, such as roads, bridges, utilities, buildings, schools, recreational areas and similar publicly owned property, as well as certain private non-profit organizations engaged in community service activities. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)
  • Payment of not more than 75 percent of the approved costs for hazard mitigation projects undertaken by state, tribal and local governments to prevent or reduce long-term risk to life and property from natural or technological disasters. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)

How to Apply for Assistance:

  • Application procedures for state, tribal and local governments will be explained at a series of federal/state applicant briefings with locations to be announced in the affected area by recovery officials. Approved public repair projects are paid through the state from funding provided by FEMA and other participating federal agencies.

FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders and ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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Quinault Nation Declares State of EmergencyThursday, April 3, 2014 - agrandon
http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/03/26/quinault-nation-declares-state-emergency-wind-and-waves-breach-taholah-seawall-154182
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President Declares Disaster for WashingtonThursday, April 3, 2014 - agrandon

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced that federal disaster aid has been made available to the State of Washington to supplement state, tribal, and local recovery efforts in the area affected by flooding and mudslides beginning on March 22, 2014, and continuing.

This assistance is in addition to the support provided under the Presidential Emergency Declaration granted on March 24, 2014.

The President's action makes federal funding available to affected individuals in Snohomish County, including the Sauk-Suiattle, Stillaguamish, and Tulalip Tribes.

Assistance can include grants for temporary housing and home repairs, low-cost loans to cover uninsured property losses, and other programs to help individuals and business owners recover from the effects of the disaster.

Federal funding is available to state and eligible tribal and local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work due to flooding and mudslides in Snohomish County, including the lands associated with the Sauk-Suiattle, Stillaguamish, and Tulalip Tribes.

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.

Due to the localized impacts of the disaster, FEMA will work closely with residents, tribal members, and business owners who sustained losses in the designated area on a one on one basis. 

Michael J. Hall has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area.  Hall said additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further damage assessments.

Following is a summary of key federal disaster aid programs that can be made available as needed and warranted under President Obama’s major disaster declaration issued for Washington.

Assistance for Affected Individuals and Families Can Include as Required:

  • Rental payments for temporary housing for those whose homes were destroyed or are unlivable.  Initial assistance may be provided for up to three months for homeowners and at least one month for renters.  Assistance may be extended if requested after the initial period based on a review of individual applicant requirements.  (Source: FEMA funded and administered.)
  • Grants for home repairs and replacement of essential household items not covered by insurance to make damaged dwellings safe, sanitary and functional.  (Source: FEMA funded and administered.)
  • Grants to replace personal property and help meet medical, dental, funeral, transportation, child care assistance and other serious disaster-related needs not covered by insurance or other federal, state and charitable aid programs.   (Source: FEMA funded at 75 percent of total eligible costs; 25 percent funded by the state.)
  • Unemployment payments up to 26 weeks for workers who temporarily lost jobs because of the disaster and who do not qualify for state benefits, such as self-employed individuals.  (Source: FEMA funded; state administered.)
  • Low-interest loans to cover residential losses not fully compensated by insurance.  Loans available up to $200,000 for primary residence; $40,000 for personal property, including renter losses.  Loans available up to $2 million for business property losses not fully compensated by insurance.  (Source: U.S. Small Business Administration.)
  • Loans up to $2 million for small businesses, small agricultural cooperatives and most private, non-profit organizations of all sizes that have suffered disaster-related cash flow problems and need funds for working capital to recover from the disaster's adverse economic impact.  This loan in combination with a property loss loan cannot exceed a total of $2 million. (Source: U.S. Small Business Administration.)
  • Loans up to $500,000 for farmers, ranchers and aquaculture operators to cover production and property losses, excluding primary residence.  (Source: Farm Service Agency, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.)
  • Other relief programs: Crisis counseling for those traumatized by the disaster; income tax assistance for filing casualty losses; advisory assistance for legal, veterans’ benefits and social security matters.

How to Apply for Individual Assistance:

  • Due to the localized impacts of the disaster, FEMA will work closely with residents, tribal members and business owners who sustained losses in the designated area on a one-on-one basis. 
  • Affected individuals and business owners in designated areas can begin the disaster application process by registering online, at www.DisasterAssistance.gov or by calling 1-800-621-FEMA (3362) or by web enabled mobile device at m.fema.gov.  Disaster assistance applicants, who have a speech disability or hearing loss and use TTY, should call 1-800-462-7585 directly; for those who use 711 or Video Relay Service (VRS), call 1-800-621-3362 . Online registration is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.  The toll-free telephone numbers are operating from 4 a.m. to 8 p.m. local time seven days a week until further notice. Applicants registering for aid should be prepared to provide basic information about themselves (name, permanent address, phone number), insurance coverage and any other information to help substantiate losses.

Assistance for the State, Tribes and Affected Local Governments Can Include as Required:

  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for emergency protective measures taken to save lives and protect property and public health.  Emergency protective measures assistance is available to state, tribal and eligible local governments on a cost-sharing basis. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for recovery and cleanup from public areas and for emergency measures taken to save lives and protect property and public health, including direct federal assistance, under the Public Assistance program.(Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)
  • Payment of not more than 75 percent of the approved costs for hazard mitigation projects undertaken by state, tribal and local governments to prevent or reduce long-term risk to life and property from natural or technological disasters.  (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)

How to Apply for Public Assistance:

  • Application procedures for tribal and local governments will be explained at a series of federal/state and federal/tribal applicant briefings with locations to be announced in the affected area by recovery officials. Approved public repair projects are paid through the state from funding provided by FEMA and other participating federal agencies.

FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Follow FEMA online at blog.fema.gov, www.twitter.com/fema, www.facebook.com/fema, and www.youtube.com/fema.  Also, follow Administrator Craig Fugate's activities at www.twitter.com/craigatfema.  The social media links provided are for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or application.

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President Declares Disaster for AlaskaFriday, January 24, 2014 - agrandon

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency announced that federal disaster aid has been made available to the State of Alaska and ordered federal aid to supplement state, tribal, and local recovery efforts in the area affected by severe storms, straight-line winds, and flooding during the period of November 5-14, 2013.

The President's action makes federal funding available to state and eligible tribal and local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by severe storms, straight-line winds, and flooding in the Bering Strait Regional Education Attendance Area (REAA), Fairbanks North Star Borough, Lower Kuskokwim REAA, and Lower Yukon REAA.

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.

Dolph A. Diemont has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area. Diemont said additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further damage assessments.

Following is a summary of key federal disaster aid programs that can be made available as needed and warranted under President Obama's disaster declaration issued for the State of Alaska.

Assistance for State, Tribal, and Affected Local Governments Can Include as Required:

  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for emergency protective measures taken to save lives and protect property and public health. Emergency protective measures assistance is available to state and eligible local governments on a cost-sharing basis. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)
  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for repairing or replacing damaged public facilities, such as roads, bridges, utilities, buildings, schools, recreational areas and similar publicly owned property, as well as certain private non-profit organizations engaged in community service activities. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)
  • Payment of not more than 75 percent of the approved costs for hazard mitigation projects undertaken by state and local governments to prevent or reduce long-term risk to life and property from natural or technological disasters. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)

How to Apply for Assistance:

  • Application procedures for state, tribal, and local governments will be explained at a series of federal/state applicant briefings with locations to be announced in the affected area by recovery officials. Approved public repair projects are paid through the state from funding provided by FEMA and other participating federal agencies.
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President Declares Disaster for AlaskaThursday, January 16, 2014 - agrandon

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency announced that federal disaster aid has been made available to the State of Alaska and ordered federal aid to supplement state, tribal, and local recovery efforts in the area affected by flooding during the period of October 27-28, 2013.

The President's action makes federal funding available to state and eligible tribal and local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by flooding in the Kenai Peninsula Borough.

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.

Dolph A. Diemont has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area. Diemont said additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further damage assessments.

Following is a summary of key federal disaster aid programs that can be made available as needed and warranted under President Obama's disaster declaration issued for the State of Alaska.

Assistance for the State, Tribal, and Affected Local Governments Can Include as Required:

  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for emergency protective measures taken to save lives and protect property and public health. Emergency protective measures assistance is available to state and eligible local governments on a cost-sharing basis. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)
  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for repairing or replacing damaged public facilities, such as roads, bridges, utilities, buildings, schools, recreational areas and similar publicly owned property, as well as certain private non-profit organizations engaged in community service activities. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)
  • Payment of not more than 75 percent of the approved costs for hazard mitigation projects undertaken by state and local governments to prevent or reduce long-term risk to life and property from natural or technological disasters. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)

How to Apply for Assistance:

  • Application procedures for state, tribal, and local governments will be explained at a series of federal/state applicant briefings with locations to be announced in the affected area by recovery officials. Approved public repair projects are paid through the state from funding provided by FEMA and other participating federal agencies.
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Alaskans Encouraged to Prepare for Extreme Winter ThreatsThursday, October 17, 2013 - agrandon

ANCHORAGE, Alaska - Alaska’s winters can bring deep cold, high winds, floods, avalanches and more. The key to surviving any unexpected weather hazard is preparation, according to state and federal emergency management officials.

“We urge all Alaskans to plan ahead for the dangerous threats our winters bring,” said State Coordinating Officer Bryan Fisher of the Alaska Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. “Advance preparation is key to remaining self-reliant and ensuring the safety of our families during hazardous situations.”

Every part of Alaska is vulnerable to natural disasters. Wind-driven waves from intense storms crossing the Bering Sea produce coastal flooding that can drive large chunks of sea ice inland, destroying buildings near the shore.

High winds, especially across Alaska’s Arctic coast, can combine with loose snow to produce a blinding blizzard and life threatening wind chills. Extreme cold and ice fog can last a week or more at a time.

Heavy snow can impact the interior and is common along the southern coast. Heavy snow accumulation in the mountains builds glaciers, but can also cause avalanches or collapse building roofs throughout the state.

“Although there are just three steps to preparing for emergencies, folks tend to put off getting them done,” said Federal Coordinating Officer Dolph Diemont of FEMA. “One easy approach is to make preparation a family project for just an hour or two over a couple of weekends.”

The three easy steps to prepare for winter disasters in Alaska are:

Step 1 – Make a Plan:

  • Your family may not be together when disaster strikes, so it is important to know how you will contact one another and what each of you will do in case of an emergency.
  • Decide on an emergency plan together. Keep information handy that isn’t easy to remember and store it in a safe place. Make a game or song to help younger children memorize important information.
  • Pick one friend or relative for each person to call to help your family get connected if you become separated. An out-of-town contact is best because long-distance phone service is less likely than local service to be affected by an emergency.
  • Know where you will meet. Pick a meeting place for when family members are at home and find out the evacuation locations for work, school, day care and other place family members often go.
  • Write down important information for all family members – name, social security number, date of birth and important medical information. Collect telephone numbers for doctors and pharmacies, along with critical health, homeowner and/or rental insurance information.

Step 2 – Get a kit of emergency supplies:

  • You may need to rely on your own supplies for at least seven days, maybe longer. Local officials and relief workers will be on the scene after a disaster, but they cannot reach everyone immediately, especially in rural parts of Alaska. Basic services such as electricity, gas, water, sewer and telephones could be cut off for days or longer.
  • Remember to include unique family needs like pet supplies, infant formula and medicines. Store these items in easy-to-carry bags or bins. Consider two kits – one for home and a second lightweight, portable kit to keep in your car.
  • Both kits should include a battery-powered or hand-crank radio, extra flashlights and batteries. Thoroughly check and update your family’s emergency supply kit for winter weather.

Step 3 – Stay informed:

  • Some of the things you can do to prepare for the unexpected during Alaska’s winters are the same regardless of the type of emergency. However, it’s important to stay informed about the emergency that may affect your family.
  • Listen to a NOAA weather radio or local news broadcasts for critical information about changing weather conditions.
  • Follow instructions from local authorities. Above all, stay calm, be patient and think before you act.

With these simple preparations, you can be ready for the unexpected during Alaska’s unpredictable winters. Learn more at http://ready.alaska.gov and http://www.ready.gov.

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Tribal Corps Aids Alaska Flood RecoveryFriday, October 11, 2013 - agrandon

Tribal Corps Aids Alaska Flood Recovery: Sweat, Service and Spirit in the Last Frontier

Main Content
Release date:
October 10, 2013
Release Number:
NR-023

HUGHES, Alaska – On a late September afternoon sprinkled with snow flurries, eight young adults in mud-streaked protective bodysuits and breathing masks installed blankets of insulation to the underside of a weather-worn cabin in the Alaskan Bush.

Two of them partnered off to move 8-foot by 4-foot sheets of plywood from a nearby shed to the house, while five others dragged themselves through the soggy soil in a tiny crawl space to fasten thermal lining to the underbelly of the home.

Later in the day, Cesar Flores, the team’s leader, stood beside a resident’s smokehouse observing a nearly six-foot-wide rack of a bull moose that was taken the day before.

“We don’t normally see things like this where we’re from,” said Flores. “We’re humbled to have been given this opportunity to come all the way out here and help a Native community recover.”

As a result of a major disaster declaration on June 25, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is providing assistance to Hughes and other disaster affected communities, including covering transportation and other costs for more than 200 AmeriCorps members and volunteers.

From their center of operations on the largest Native American reservation in California to a small indigenous village in Interior Alaska, the Hughes team worked tirelessly to remove flood-soaked tile and wood from flooring and walls, clear out spoiled furniture, and begin minor repairs on several homes that were damaged when the Koyukuk River overtopped its banks earlier this year.

They are specially trained AmeriCorps members from the Hoopa Tribal Civilian Community Corps (TCCC) — based out of the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation in Northern California —that helped Alaska Natives in Hughes navigate the rough patches of recovery and reconstruction.

Of the two dozen or so homes in Hughes, nearly a quarter of them were damaged by floodwaters that inundated the village in late May.

Hoopa TCCC members mucked, gutted and prepared six homes before handing them off to Disciples of Christ disaster response volunteers to complete the critical structural repairs. As the construction season comes to an end in Hughes, all but one of the damaged residences have been repaired and families are ready to overwinter in their own homes.

“It was a great idea to have the Hoopa AmeriCorps team come to Hughes to assist in rebuilding the homes,” said Thelma Nicholia of the Hughes Tribe. “We wouldn’t have been able to do it this fall if they didn’t come and help.”

Hoopa TCCC spent nearly two weeks in the Koyukon Athabascan village, a community of about 87 people where traditional ways of life still persist. In September, residents not only had to worry about repairing their homes, they had to hunt, fish and gather food to sustain their families through the winter months — a practice dating back thousands of years.

“Having the Hoopa group in Hughes was a smart decision and it turned out to be a great match,” said Ramona VanCleve, tribal liaison for FEMA’s spring flood recovery operation in Alaska. “They were a nice, thoughtful group to send in to a community so remote and with such a high percentage of Alaska Natives.”

Sitting on three square miles of land pinched between the Koyukuk River and a 500-foot bluff, Hughes is one of the eight communities in Alaska most affected by the spring floods. What’s more, the village’s lack of a road network combined with the state’s harsh climate made it a challenge for disaster response and recovery efforts.

Just before Hoopa TCCC arrived in Hughes, nearly two dozen men from the village were called down to the Lower 48 to help fight the blazes that ripped through parts of Yosemite National Park. While a chunk of the workforce was tied up in California for two weeks, Hoopa TCCC filled in where it could.

“There was a lot of work to be done in Hughes,” said Sebastian Ferris, a Hoopa TCCC member from the Hoopa Valley Tribe. “But we did it, and we happily did more than what was expected because we wanted to help this community — our brothers and sisters.”

Beyond home repairs, the members accompanied locals downriver to gather wood for stovetop cooking and helped to build smokehouses for drying moose meat.

Hoopa TCCC members embraced the Athabascan culture and spent most of their downtime socializing in the community. They played with the village children in the local playground and shared moose stew with the village elders.

“Sharing is an important part of Athabascan culture,” said VanCleve. “To the people in Hughes, what’s more friendship-building than sharing a traditional meal of moose stew?”

“We’re Natives, so there was an instant bond and connection,” said Luis Rea, a Hoopa TCCC member from the Chickasaw Nation. “We really felt like we became part of the family.”

Hoopa TCCC members come from all over the U.S. and represent several Native American tribes. The group serving in Hughes, in particular, is made up of members not only from the Hoopa Valley Tribe — an Athabascan group from the Trinity River valley in California, but also the Pit River Tribe in northeast California, the Chickasaw Nation in Oklahoma and the Navajo Nation in New Mexico.

“This is the second time in my 15 years of being with TCCC that we have been mission assigned by FEMA to serve another Native American population in a disaster area,” said Tahsanchat Ferris-Wilson, program director for Hoopa TCCC. “Our program is sensitive to the needs in Indian Country, as we call it. Native people relate to other Native people.”

In events like the flooding in Alaska, the State and FEMA rely on voluntary organizations and national service groups like AmeriCorps to provide critical help for disaster survivors. AmeriCorps, through its parent agency the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), enlisted Hoopa TCCC along with 17 FEMA Corps and 67 other service corps members and staff to join the recovery front in several flood-ravaged areas in Alaska.

"In times of great need TCCC Hoopa is always first in line to serve," said Kelly DeGraff, senior advisor for Disaster Services at CNCS. "The TCCC members often take on the toughest assignments and they are the perfect illustration of how powerful national service can be when responding to those in need."

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More Than $2 Million Approved for 2013 Flood SurvivorsTuesday, July 23, 2013 - agrandon

ANCHORAGE, Alaska – Less than a month after federal disaster aid was made available to the State of Alaska, more than $1 million in awards and more than $1 million in loans have been approved for households and businesses to help them recover from losses caused by the flooding of the Yukon River that occurred between May 17 and June 11, 2013, disaster officials announced today.

"It's important to note that awards are a form of financial disaster-aid that does not have to be repaid," said Federal Coordinating Officer Dolph Diemont of the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Low-interest loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), he pointed out, provide amounts needed for extensive repairs and rebuilding.

Assistance made available as of July 21, 2013, includes:

  • $1,033,234 in FEMA awards disbursed to individuals and households.
  • $422,373 for housing assistance.
  • $610,860 for other needs.
  • $1,029,500 in low-interest disaster loans approved by the U.S. Small Business Administration for homeowners, renters and businesses.
  • 285 housing inspections completed.
  • 289 visits to Disaster Recovery Centers.
  • 170 face-to-face meetings with survivors have been conducted by FEMA’s Individual Assistance Task Force in the cities of Emmonak, Alakanuk, Fort Yukon, Hughes, Circle, Eagle, and Tok as well as at the Willow House in Fairbanks.

The funds for individuals and households are made available to people found to be eligible for assistance in the Regional Educational Attendance Areas (REAAs) of Alaska Gateway, Lower Yukon, Yukon Flats, and Yukon-Koyukuk.

“While state, federal, and voluntary organizations continue to respond to the serious needs of people and communities who suffered losses as a result of the flooding, we strongly urge everyone who suffered losses in those REAAs to register for help with FEMA,” said State Coordinating Officer Bryan Fisher.

Those with flooding losses in the eligible REAAs can register by calling 800-621-FEMA (3362) or online at DisasterAssistance.gov. Registration by mobile device is also available at www.m.fema.gov. Those with a speech disability or hearing loss who use TTY can call 800-462-7585 (TTY). Multilingual registration can be done by phone.

Applicants can apply for an SBA disaster loan online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via SBA’s secure Web site at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela.

Residents and business owners can obtain information on SBA disaster loans by calling SBA’s Customer Service Center toll-free at (800) 659-2955 , emailing disastercustomerservice@sba.gov or visiting SBA’s Web site at www.sba.gov/services/disasterassistance. Individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing can call (800) 877-8339.

Those affected can register in person at one of the two Disaster Recovery Centers (DRCs) that have been set up to assist individuals, households and businesses affected by the spring floods:

  • In Galena at the Galena Interior Learning Academy, 359 Challenger Road,
  • In Fairbanks at 751 Old Richardson Hwy., Suite 202.

Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Saturday, at both DRCs.

If you intend to register at one of the DRCs, please bring:

  • Your Social Security number
  • Current and pre-disaster address
  • Block and lot number
  • A telephone number where you can be contacted
  • Insurance information
  • Total household annual income

Staff at the DRCs can review and update applicant information and address individual questions and concerns.

The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) offers disaster loans to homeowners, renters, businesses and private, nonprofit organizations to cover costs of repair or replacement of damaged real estate, personal property, and business assets not covered by insurance or other aid. SBA offers disaster loans to cover working capital disaster needs caused by disaster for small businesses only and most private, nonprofit organizations,

There are three ways to apply for an SBA disaster loan: After registering with FEMA, go online to SBA’s secure site at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela; call 1-800-659-2955 (deaf and hard-of-hearing call 1-800-877-8339 ); or, visit the Disaster Recovery Center for one-on-one service. For more information on SBA disaster assistance, go to www.sba.gov.

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State, FEMA Disaster Recovery Center Opens in FairbanksTuesday, July 16, 2013 - agrandon

ANCHORAGE, Alaska – A state and federal Disaster Recovery Center (DRC) is set to open Tuesday, July 16, in Fairbanks to assist individuals, households and businesses affected by the 2013 spring floods.

The center is located at 751 Old Richardson Hwy., Suite 202, Fairbanks, AK 99701. The center provides face-to-face help from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., seven days a week until further notice.

The center is staffed by disaster recovery specialists who can provide information and answer questions about flood-related assistance.

Those with 2013 spring flooding losses in the Alaska Gateway Regional Educational Attendance Area (REAA), Lower Yukon REAA, Yukon Flats REAA, and the Yukon-Koyukuk REAA are encouraged to register with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) by calling 800-621-FEMA (3362) or online at DisasterAssistance.gov. Registration by mobile device is also available at www.m.fema.gov. Those with a speech disability or hearing loss who use TTY can call 800-462-7585 (TTY). Multilingual registration can be done by phone.

Staff at the recovery centers can review and update applicant information and address individual questions and concerns.

Those individuals unable to register by phone or online may register at the DRC. If you intend to register at the DRC, please bring:

  • Your Social Security number
  • Current and pre-disaster address
  • Block and lot number
  • A telephone number where you can be contacted
  • Insurance information

Total household annual income

  • A routing and account number from your bank (only necessary if you want to have disaster assistance funds transferred directly into your bank account). Lookup your bank routing number.
  • A description of your losses that were caused by the disaster.

FEMA disaster assistance may include grants to help pay for housing, replace personal property and reimburse medical, storage and other serious disaster-related expenses not covered by insurance or charities. Assistance may also include low-interest federal disaster loans from the Small Business Administration (SBA).

SBA offers disaster loans to homeowners, renters, businesses of all sizes and private, nonprofit organizations for their uncompensated losses. Homeowners may borrow up to $200,000 to repair or replace their primary residence. Homeowners and renters may borrow up to $40,000 to replace personal property. Businesses may borrow up to $2 million to repair or replace their property damage and/or economic losses.

There are three ways to apply for an SBA disaster loan: After registering with FEMA, go online to SBA’s secure site at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela; call 1-800-659-2955 (deaf and hard-of-hearing call 1-800-877-8339 ); or, visit the Disaster Recovery Center for one-on-one service. For more information on SBA disaster assistance, go to www.sba.gov.

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FEMA Disaster Recovery Center Open in GalenaMonday, July 8, 2013 - agrandon

ANCHORAGE, Alaska – A state and federal Disaster Recovery Center (DRC) is open in Galena to assist individuals, households and businesses affected by the 2013 spring floods.

The center is located at Building 1847, Composite Building, Galena Interior Learning Academy, 359 Challenger Road, Galena, AK 99741. GPS Coordinates: N 64 44.505, W 156 57.222. The DRC will be open seven days a week until further notice.

The center is staffed by disaster recovery specialists who can provide information and answer questions about flood-related assistance.

Those with 2013 spring flooding losses are encouraged to register with FEMA by calling 800-621-FEMA (3362) or online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov. Registration by mobile device is also available at www.m.fema.gov. Those with a speech disability or hearing loss who use TTY can call 800-462-7585 (TTY). Multilingual registration can be done by phone.

Staff at the DRC will quickly review and update applicant information and address individual questions and concerns.

Those individuals unable to register by phone or online may register at the DRC. If you intend to register at the DRC, please bring:

  • Your Social Security number
  • Current and pre-disaster address
  • Block and lot number.
  • A telephone number where you can be contacted
  • Insurance information
  • Total household annual income
  • A routing and account number from your bank (only necessary if you want to have disaster assistance funds transferred directly into your bank account). Lookup your bank routing number.
  • A description of your losses that were caused by the disaster.

FEMA disaster assistance may include grants to help pay for housing, replace personal property and reimburse medical, storage and other serious disaster-related expenses not covered by insurance or charities. Assistance may also include low-interest federal disaster loans from the Small Business Administration (SBA).

SBA offers disaster loans to homeowners, renters, businesses of all sizes and private, nonprofit organizations for their uncompensated losses. Homeowners may borrow up to $200,000 to repair or replace their primary residence. Homeowners and renters may borrow up to $40,000 to replace personal property. Businesses may borrow up to $2 million to repair or replace their property damage and/or economic losses.

You can apply in person for an SBA disaster loan at the DRC and receive one-on-one help from an SBA representative. For additional information on SBA disaster loan assistance, call SBA at 800-659-2955 , or visit www.sba.gov/services/disasterassistance. Those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing and use TTY may call 800-877-8339 directly.

FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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Obama declares federal disaster for spring flooding in Alaska Wednesday, June 26, 2013 - agrandon

— President Barack Obama has declared a federal disaster for spring flooding in parts of Alaska.

Gov. Sean Parnell earlier this month requested the federal designation for the Alaska Gateway, Yukon Flats, Yukon Koyukuk, Lower Yukon and Copper River regional educational attendance areas. The areas include Galena and other communities affected by flooding in May and June.

The president's declaration will make funding available for emergency work and repair of public infrastructure. The Federal Emergency Management Agency says funding to share the costs of mitigating hazards also will be available.

Individual assistance for temporary housing, home repairs and other expenses will be available in all areas except the Copper River regional educational attendance area.


Read more here: http://www.adn.com/2013/06/25/2952989/president-declares-disaster-for.html#storylink=cpy

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WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency announced that federal disaster aid has been made available to the State of Alaska and ordered federal aid to supplement state, tribal, and local recovery efforts in the area affected by flooding during the period of May 17 to June 11, 2013.

The President's action makes federal funding available to affected individuals in Alaska Gateway Regional Educational Attendance Area (REAA), Lower Yukon REAA, Yukon Flats REAA, and the Yukon-Koyukuk REAA.

Assistance can include grants for temporary housing and home repairs, low-cost loans to cover uninsured property losses, and other programs to help individuals and business owners recover from the effects of the disaster.

Federal funding is also available to state, tribal, and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by the flooding in the Alaska Gateway Regional Educational Attendance Area (REAA), Copper River REAA, Lower Yukon REAA, Yukon Flats REAA, and the Yukon-Koyukuk REAA.

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.

Dolph A. Diemont has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area. Diemont said additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further damage assessments.

Individuals and business owners who sustained losses in the designated area can begin applying for assistance by registering online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov or by calling 1-800-621-FEMA (3362) or by web enabled mobile device at m.fema.gov. Disaster assistance applicants, who have a speech disability or hearing loss and use TTY, should call 1-800-462-7585 directly; for those who use 711 or Video Relay Service (VRS), call 1-800-621-3362. The toll-free telephone numbers will operate from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. (local time) seven days a week until further notice.

 Following is a summary of key federal disaster aid programs that can be made available as needed and warranted under President Obama’s major disaster declaration issued for Alaska.

Assistance for Affected Individuals and Families Can Include as Required:

  • Rental payments for temporary housing for those whose homes are unlivable. Initial assistance may be provided for up to three months for homeowners and at least one month for renters. Assistance may be extended if requested after the initial period based on a review of individual applicant requirements. (Source: FEMA funded and administered.)
  • Grants for home repairs and replacement of essential household items not covered by insurance to make damaged dwellings safe, sanitary and functional. (Source: FEMA funded and administered.)
  • Grants to replace personal property and help meet medical, dental, funeral, transportation and other serious disaster-related needs not covered by insurance or other federal, state and charitable aid programs. (Source: FEMA funded at 75 percent of total eligible costs; 25 percent funded by the state.)
  • Unemployment payments up to 26 weeks for workers who temporarily lost jobs because of the disaster and who do not qualify for state benefits, such as self-employed individuals. (Source: FEMA funded; state administered.)
  • Low-interest loans to cover residential losses not fully compensated by insurance. Loans available up to $200,000 for primary residence; $40,000 for personal property, including renter losses. Loans available up to $2 million for business property losses not fully compensated by insurance. (Source: U.S. Small Business Administration.)
  • Loans up to $2 million for small businesses, small agricultural cooperatives and most private, non-profit organizations of all sizes that have suffered disaster-related cash flow problems and need funds for working capital to recover from the disaster's adverse economic impact. This loan in combination with a property loss loan cannot exceed a total of $2 million. (Source: U.S. Small Business Administration.)
  • Loans up to $500,000 for farmers, ranchers and aquaculture operators to cover production and property losses, excluding primary residence. (Source: Farm Service Agency, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture.)
  • Other relief programs: Crisis counseling for those traumatized by the disaster; income tax assistance for filing casualty losses; advisory assistance for legal, veterans’ benefits and social security matters.

Assistance for the State, Tribal, and Affected Local Governments Can Include as Required:

  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for removing debris from public areas and for emergency measures taken to save lives and protect property and public health, including direct federal assistance, under the Public Assistance program.(Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)
  • Payment of not more than 75 percent of the approved costs for hazard mitigation projects undertaken by state and local governments to prevent or reduce long-term risk to life and property from natural or technological disasters. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)

How to Apply for Assistance:

  • Those in the area designated for assistance to affected individuals and business owners can begin the disaster application process by registering online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov or by calling 1-800-621-FEMA (3362) or by web enabled mobile device at m.fema.gov. Disaster assistance applicants, who have a speech disability or hearing loss and use TTY, should call 1-800-462-7585 directly; for those who use 711 or Video Relay Service (VRS), call 1-800-621-3362. The toll-free telephone numbers will operate from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. (local time) seven days a week until further notice. Applicants registering for aid should be prepared to provide basic information about themselves (name, permanent address, phone number), insurance coverage and any other information to help substantiate losses.
  • Application procedures for local governments will be explained at a series of federal/state applicant briefings with locations to be announced in the affected area by recovery officials. Approved public repair projects are paid through the state from funding provided by FEMA and other participating federal agencies.
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Ice jam causes flooding in Galena, AlaskaFriday, May 31, 2013 - agrandon

GALENA, Alaska, May 30 (UPI) -- An ice jam in the Yukon River in Alaska caused flooding in the city of Galena and forced the evacuation of 300 people, officials said.

Rapid warming in the region led to an influx of water in the river basin and when a wall of ice got hung up in a curve in the river, it caused that water to back up and flood Galena, said Kerry Seifert, operations section chief at the Alaska Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management.

"We expect the flooding to become worse before the waters start to recede," Alaska Gov. Sean Parnell said.

Some 300 people who live in Galena were evacuated to Fairbanks and Ruby, where some are staying with friends and family, and others are at shelters, CNN reported Thursday.

"Ensuring the safety of those impacted by the flooding remains my top priority," Parnell said.

Water appeared to be moving around the ice jam Wednesday, Seifert said. When the ice jam breaks, there could be a flooding risk downriver in Koyukuk and Nulato.

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