Region VIII

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President Declares Disaster for Montana Friday, October 10, 2014 - agrandon

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency announced that federal disaster aid has been made available to the state of Montana to supplement state, local and tribal recovery efforts in the area affected by severe storms, straight-line winds, and flooding during the period of August 21-25, 2014.

The President's action makes federal funding available to state and eligible local and tribal governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by severe storms, straight-line winds, and flooding in Blaine, Carter, Musselshell, Petroleum, and Valley counties and the Fort Belknap Reservation within Blaine County.

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures statewide.

Benigno Bern Ruiz has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area.  Ruiz said additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further damage assessments.

Following is a summary of key federal disaster aid programs that can be made available as needed and warranted under President Obama's disaster declaration issued for Montana.

Assistance for the State, Tribal and Affected Local Governments Can Include as Required:

  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for debris removal and emergency protective measures, including direct federal assistance, taken to save lives and protect property and public health.  Emergency protective measures assistance is available to state, tribal and eligible local governments on a cost-sharing basis. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)
  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for repairing or replacing damaged public facilities, such as roads, bridges, utilities, buildings, schools, recreational areas and similar publicly owned property, as well as certain private non-profit organizations engaged in community service activities. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)
  • Payment of not more than 75 percent of the approved costs for hazard mitigation projects undertaken by state, tribal and local governments to prevent or reduce long-term risk to life and property from natural or technological disasters.  (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)

How to Apply for Assistance:

  • Application procedures for state, tribal and local governments will be explained at a series of federal/state applicant briefings with locations to be announced in the affected area by recovery officials. Approved public repair projects are paid through the state from funding provided by FEMA and other participating federal agencies.
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President Declares Disaster for North DakotaWednesday, August 20, 2014 - agrandon

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency announced that federal disaster aid has been made available to the State of North Dakota to supplement state, tribal, and local recovery efforts in the area affected by severe storms and flooding during the period of June 25 to July 1, 2014.

The President's action makes federal funding available to state and eligible tribal and local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by severe storms and flooding in Benson, Bottineau, Divide, Eddy, McHenry, Mountrail, Pierce, Renville, and Ward counties and the Standing Rock Indian Reservation.

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures for all counties and tribes within the state.

Lee K. dePalo has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area and said additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further damage assessments.

Following is a summary of key federal disaster aid programs that can be made available as needed and warranted under President Obama's disaster declaration issued for the State of North Dakota.

Assistance for the State, Tribal and Affected Local Governments Can Include as Required:

  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for debris removal and emergency protective measures taken to save lives and protect property and public health.  Emergency protective measures assistance is available to state and eligible tribal and local governments on a cost-sharing basis. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)
  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for repairing or replacing damaged public facilities, such as roads, bridges, utilities, buildings, schools, recreational areas, and similar publicly owned property, as well as certain private non-profit organizations engaged in community service activities. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)
  • Payment of not more than 75 percent of the approved costs for hazard mitigation projects undertaken by state, tribal, and local governments to prevent or reduce long-term risk to life and property from natural or technological disasters. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)

How to Apply for Assistance:

  • Application procedures for state, tribal, and local governments will be explained at a series of federal/state applicant briefings with locations to be announced in the affected area by recovery officials. Approved public repair projects are paid through the state from funding provided by FEMA and other participating federal agencies.
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President Declares Disaster for South DakotaTuesday, July 29, 2014 - agrandon

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency announced that federal disaster aid has been made available to the State of South Dakota to supplement state, tribal, and local recovery efforts in the area affected by severe storms, tornadoes, and flooding during the period of June 13-20, 2014.

The President's action makes federal funding available to state and eligible tribal and local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by severe storms, tornadoes, and flooding in Butte, Clay, Corson, Dewey, Hanson, Jerauld, Lincoln, Minnehaha, Perkins, Turner, Union, and Ziebach Counties and the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe within Corson County. 

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures for all counties and tribes within the state.

Gary R. Stanley has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area.  Stanley said additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the state and warranted by the results of further damage assessments.

Following is a summary of key federal disaster aid programs that can be made available as needed and warranted under President Obama's disaster declaration issued for the State of South Dakota.

Assistance for the State, Tribal and Affected Local Governments Can Include as Required:

  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for debris removal and emergency protective measures taken to save lives and protect property and public health.  Emergency protective measures assistance is available to state and eligible tribal and local governments on a cost-sharing basis (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)
  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for repairing or replacing damaged public facilities, such as roads, bridges, utilities, buildings, schools, recreational areas, and similar publicly owned property, as well as certain private non-profit organizations engaged in community service activities. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)
  • Payment of not more than 75 percent of the approved costs for hazard mitigation projects undertaken by state, tribal, and local governments to prevent or reduce long-term risk to life and property from natural or technological disasters.  (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)

How to Apply for Assistance:

  • Application procedures for state, tribal, and local governments will be explained at a series of federal/state applicant briefings with locations to be announced in the affected area by recovery officials. Approved public repair projects are paid through the state from funding provided by FEMA and other participating federal agencies.

FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders and ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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President Declares Major Disaster for Standing Rock Sioux TribeWednesday, June 26, 2013 - agrandon

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) today announced that federal disaster aid has been made available for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and ordered federal aid to supplement the Tribe’s efforts in the area affected by severe storms and flooding during the period of May 25 to June 1, 2013.

Federal funding is available to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by the severe storms and flooding.

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures for the Tribe.

Gary R. Stanley has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for Federal recovery operations in the affected area. Stanley said additional designations may be made at a later date if requested by the Tribe and warranted by the results of further damage assessments.

Following is a summary of key federal disaster aid programs that can be made available as needed and warranted under President Obama’s major disaster declaration issued for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

Assistance for Tribal Governments Can Include as Required:

  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for removing debris from public areas and for emergency measures taken to save lives and protect property and public health. (Source: FEMA funded, Tribe administered.)
  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for repairing or replacing damaged public facilities, such as roads, bridges, utilities, buildings, schools, recreational areas and similar publicly owned property, as well as certain private non-profit organizations engaged in community service activities. (Source: FEMA funded, Tribe administered.)
  • Payment of not more than 75 percent of the approved costs for hazard mitigation projects undertaken by tribal government to prevent or reduce long-term risk to life and property from natural or technological disasters. (Source: FEMA funded, Tribe administered.)

How to Apply for Assistance:

  • Application procedures for the Tribal governments will be explained at a series of federal/Tribal applicant briefings with locations to be announced in the affected area by recovery officials. Approved public repair projects are paid through the Tribe from funding provided by FEMA and other participating federal agencies.
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FEMA: Affected Residents of Two Colorado Wildfires Could be Eligible for Immediate Flood Insurance PoliciesTuesday, July 10, 2012 - agrandon

WASHINGTON – The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) today announced, based on consultation with the U.S. Forest Service, that residents in Colorado affected by flooding as a result of the uncontained wildfire in Waldo Canyon in the Pike National Forest and the contained wildfire in High Park in the Arapaho-Roosevelt National Forest could be eligible for an exception from the 30-day waiting period usually required for flood insurance coverage.

The Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2012, signed into law Friday by President Obama, increases access to the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) for some residents whose homes were impacted by flooding from federal land that resulted from wildfires. The new law exempts these residents from a 30-day waiting period for flood insurance coverage to become effective. Eligibility for the exception is determined on a case-by-case basis.

“Everyone should know their flood risk and make a smart decision based on their risk on whether they should join the millions of Americans who have purchased flood insurance for their homes,” said David Miller, Associate Administrator of the Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration (FIMA). “Residents impacted by wildfires might live in an area that doesn’t usually have a high risk of flooding, but the fires and dry soil change conditions dramatically. This new law provides a way for people with a heightened risk of flooding following a wildfire on federal land to protect their homes and businesses, and we encourage them to explore this option.”

Individuals and businesses purchasing new insurance policies from the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) are typically required to wait 30 days for their flood insurance coverage to become effective. The reform provision in this bill created an exception to that requirement for property:

  • That is affected by flooding on Federal land,
  • Where the flooding is caused, or exacerbated by, post-wildfire conditions on Federal land, and
  • Flood insurance was purchased not later than 60 days after the wildfire containment date.

Floods are the number one natural disaster in the United States in terms of lives lost and property damaged. The NFIP provides a means for property owners to financially protect themselves against flooding, which typically isn’t covered by standard homeowners insurance. The NFIP offers flood insurance to homeowners, renters, and business owners if their community participates in the NFIP. Participating communities agree to adopt and enforce ordinances that meet or exceed FEMA requirements to reduce the risk of flooding.

The National Flood Insurance Program is administered by FEMA, which works with nearly 90 private insurance companies to provide affordable flood insurance to property owners and renters in NFIP-participating communities. One of the most critical ways to financially protect your home or business and its contents from flooding is to purchase flood insurance. To learn about flood risks in your area and for information on flood insurance, contact your insurance agent, and visit www.floodsmart.gov. For more information on flood preparedness tips and ways you can protect your family before, during and after a flood visit www.ready.gov/floods.

FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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President Declares Major Disaster for ColoradoFriday, June 29, 2012 - agrandon

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) today announced that federal disaster assistance has been made available to Colorado to supplement state and local recovery efforts in the areas affected by the High Park and Waldo Canyon Fires beginning on June 9, 2012, and continuing.

Federal funding is available for Crisis Counseling and Disaster Unemployment Assistance for affected individuals in El Paso and Larimer counties impacted by the High Park and Waldo Canyon Fires.

Federal funding also is available to state, and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency protective measures, including direct federal assistance, for El Paso and Larimer counties impacted by the High Park and Waldo Canyon Fires.

Michael F. Byrne has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area. Byrne said that damage surveys are continuing in other areas, and more counties and additional forms of assistance may be designated after the assessments are fully completed.

Following is a summary of key federal disaster aid programs that can be made available as needed and warranted under President Obama’s major disaster declaration issued for Colorado.

Assistance for the State and Affected Local Governments Can Include as Required:

  • Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for emergency measures, including direct federal assistance, taken to save lives and protect property and public health. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)

Assistance for Affected Individuals and Families Can Include as Required:

  • Unemployment payments up to 26 weeks for workers who temporarily lost jobs because of the disaster and who do not qualify for state benefits, such as self-employed individuals. (Source: FEMA funded; state administered.)
  • Crisis counseling for those traumatized by the disaster.

How to Apply for Assistance:

  • Disaster Unemployment Assistance and Crisis Counseling are state administered programs. Application procedures for individuals will be announced in the affected area by recovery officials.
  • Application procedures for state, tribal and local governments will be explained at a series of federal/state applicant briefings with locations to be announced in the affected area by recovery officials. Approved public repair projects are paid through the state from funding provided by FEMA and other participating federal agencies.

FEMA’s mission is to support our first responders and ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Stay informed of FEMA’s activities online: videos and podcasts available at www.fema.gov/medialibrary and www.youtube.com/fema ; follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/fema and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/fema.

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FEMA Authorizes Funds to Help Fight Montana's Corral FireWednesday, June 27, 2012 - agrandon

DENVER, Colo. -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for Montana’s Corral Fire in Lewis and Clark County.

FEMA Regional Administrator Robin Finegan approved a Fire Management Assistance Grant (FMAG) upon receiving the state’s request. At the time of the request the fire was threatening 220 homes in Lewis and Clark County north of Helena. Mandatory evacuations were ordered for 220 homes at the time the request was approved. The fire is also threatening 800 structures, a rail line, schools and fire stations.

The authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the state’s eligible firefighting costs for managing, mitigating and controlling the fire. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire.

Fire Management Assistance Grants are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials and supplies.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders and to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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FEMA Authorizes Funds to Help Fight Montana's Dahl FireWednesday, June 27, 2012 - agrandon

DENVER, Colo. -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for Montana’s Dahl Fire in Musselshell County.

FEMA Regional Administrator Robin Finegan approved a Fire Management Assistance Grant (FMAG) upon receiving the state’s request. At the time of the request the fire was threatening 203 homes in the area of the town of Roundup. The fire was also threatening the Signal Mountain Coal Mine, schools and a fire station. Mandatory evacuations are ordered for 203 homes at this time.

Earlier this evening, Regional Administrator Robin Finegan approved a Fire Management Assistance Grant for the Corral Fire in Lewis and Clark County, when it was determined that the fire threatened to create major disaster. There are currently 10 large fires burning uncontrolled in Montana.

The authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the state’s eligible firefighting costs for managing, mitigating and controlling the fire. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire.

Fire Management Assistance Grants are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials and supplies.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders and to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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FEMA Authorizes Funds to Help Fight Utah's Wood Hollow FireMonday, June 25, 2012 - agrandon

DENVER, Colo. -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Wood Hollow Fire in Sanpete County.

FEMA Regional Administrator Robin Finegan approved a Fire Management Assistance Grant (FMAG) upon receiving the state’s request. At the time of the request, the fire was threatening, the fire was threatening 248 homes in and around Hideaway Valley, Oaker Hill and Elk Ridge. The fire is also threatening utilities, equipment and recreational facilities in the area.

The authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the state’s eligible firefighting costs for managing, mitigating and controlling the fire. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire.

Fire Management Assistance Grants are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials and supplies.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders and to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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FEMA Authorizes Funds to Help Fight Colorado's Waldo and Weber WildfiresMonday, June 25, 2012 - agrandon

DENVER, Colo. -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has authorized the use of federal funds to help with firefighting costs for the Waldo Fire in El Paso County and the Weber Fire in Montezuma County.

“Fighting wildfires can be very costly,” said FEMA Region 8 Administrator Robin Finegan. “FEMA doesn’t actually fight the fires, but we can help firefighters and other first responders with the financial resources they need to do their job.”

At the time of the state’s request for the Waldo Fire, the fire was threatening 250 homes in and around Manitou Springs, Cedar Creek, Carroll Canyon, Green Mountain Falls and Cascade, with a population of more 8,000. The fire was also threatening watershed, flood control structures, the United States Air Force Academy, utilities and communications equipment in the area.

At the time of the request for the Weber Fire, the fire was threatening 105 homes in and around Elk Stream Ranch, Cherry Creek and Mancos. The fire is also threatening buildings, communication towers, utilities, equipment and an area watershed.

The authorization makes FEMA funding available to pay 75 percent of the state’s eligible firefighting costs for managing, mitigating and controlling the fire. These grants do not provide assistance to individual home or business owners and do not cover other infrastructure damage caused by the fire.

On June 6, FEMA approved a FMAG for the High Park Fire in Larimer County.

Fire Management Assistance Grants are provided through the President's Disaster Relief Fund and made available by FEMA to assist in fighting fires that threaten to cause a major disaster. Eligible items can include expenses for field camps; equipment use, repair and replacement; mobilization and demobilization activities; and tools, materials and supplies.

“We continue to urge residents to heed the advice of local officials and have an emergency plan in the place,” Finegan added.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders and to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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Severe Weather Serves as Warning to PrepareMonday, June 11, 2012 - agrandon

DENVER, Co. -- A spate of severe weather-related events across the northern Rockies and Great Plains states serves as a reminder to citizens to be prepared for natural disasters.

"We have had fires, tornadoes, hail and flooding all in the past 24 hours," said Regional Administrator Robin Finegan of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in Denver. "It is also the 40th anniversary of the Rapid City, South Dakota flood, the 10th anniversary of the Colorado Hayman fire, and coming up on the first anniversary of the Souris River flood in North Dakota. Nature is giving us an important message about preparing for what may come."

Finegan pointed to recent events as evidence of the need for preparation:

  • Tornadoes touched down Thursday in Wyoming and Colorado. A tornado in southeastern Wyoming damaged 11 homes, injured one person and overturned four railroad cars, according to state emergency officials. The same system unleashed large hail in Wheatland and Laramie, Wyoming, plus up to three possible tornadoes that damaged 12 homes and injured one in Colorado, according to officials there. Hail was reported in Colorado in Weld and El Paso counties.
  • Storms in Colorado on Wednesday produced five tornadoes and hail up to eight inches deep.
  • Heavy rains in North Dakota Thursday resulted in flash flooding in McLean and Montrail counties, according to state emergency officials. More than six inches of rain fell near Parshall.
  • Severe weather is expected again Friday in eastern Montana and western North Dakota.
  • Firefighters continue fighting a 6,000-acre wildfire in the Medicine Bow National Forest in Wyoming, and a 227-acre wildfire in northern Colorado, plus smaller fires in Colorado, Montana and Utah.
  • Red Flag fire warnings are in effect for parts of Utah, Wyoming and Colorado.
  • Today is the 40th anniversary of the flood in Rapid City, South Dakota, that killed 238 people, destroyed more than 1,300 homes, and caused an estimated $165 million in damage throughout the Black Hills.
  • Today is also the 10th anniversary of the start of the Hayman fire, the largest wildfire in Colorado history. The fire burned for six weeks, destroyed 215 square miles and 132 homes, and cost $238 million to fight. The state's second-largest fire in history, the Missionary Ridge fire near Durango, started the day after the Hayman fire started and burned about half as much land.
  • June 22 will mark one year after the Souris River flood that damaged large portions of Minot, Burlington, and other parts of Ward County in North Dakota.

"Those headlines all tell us one thing - be prepared," says Finegan. "Make a disaster plan that addresses the risks you and your family are most likely to face, put together a disaster kit, and stay informed as situations develop."

A wide assortment of information on preparing yourself and your family for natural disasters is available online at www.ready.gov and www.redcross.org.

Key things to consider when making an emergency plan:

  • Families should put together a disaster plan. Everyone should know their evacuation routes and identify a site away from the disaster area where the family can meet.
  • It's important to prepare an emergency supply kit that includes a battery-powered radio, nonperishable food, bottled water, a flashlight with extra batteries and essential prescription medicine. Also, consider putting together a kit to keep in the car.
  • Everyone should heed all local warnings from local and state officials. Don't put yourself or first responders at risk. If you are told to evacuate, do so
  • Assess how your company functions, both internally and externally, to determine which staff, materials, procedures and equipment are critical to keep the business operating. Plan what you will do if your building, plant or store is not accessible.
  • Buy flood insurance to protect yourself financially. Contact your insurance agent for more information on a policy that is right for your level of risk, and visit www.floodsmart.gov for more information about flood insurance.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders and to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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2011 North Dakota Floods - Individual AssistanceThursday, December 22, 2011 - agrandon

Residents of nine North Dakota counties and one reservation were able to register for assistance with FEMA. FEMA’s Individual Assistance program provides aid to get families into safe and secure housing following a disaster and in some cases can provide for essential needs. The U.S. Small Business Administration provides low-interest loans to help get people back to their pre-disaster condition. FEMA also coordinates with voluntary agencies that deliver help that cannot be provided by government programs. A summary of efforts in North Dakota is as follows:

  • Statewide more than 10,284 individuals or households registered for assistance.
  • In total, almost $95 million has been provided. $92.8 million has been for rental assistance or home repair, while $2.1 million has been other critical unmet needs.
  • The U.S. Small Business Administration approved $245.8 million in low-interest loans. $208.6 million was approved for individuals and $37.2 million was approved for businesses.
  • Disaster Recovery Centers were open in 11 communities and received 14,921 separate visits from applicants while in operation.
  • SBA Business Recovery Centers were open in Minot and Bismarck and received a total of 2,929 visits from business owners while in operation.
  • The Disaster Unemployment Assistance program, managed by Job Service North Dakota and funded by FEMA, provided $2.2 million in benefits.
  • $3.3 million was provided to fund crisis counseling grants. (flesh this one out)

Direct Housing Mission

  • DeSour Valley Heights – located in Burlington, this 50-unit site was filled in October. It was the first group site to be completed.
  • Virgil Workman Village – located on just east of Minot, this is the largest site completed, with 600 total homes. The site was named for a FEMA housing employee who was working in North Dakota and passed away in August.
  • Recovery Village – located on the northeast edge of Minot, this was the final group site to come on line. The site can support nearly 200 homes, but currently has about 60 households.
  • Private Sites – FEMA placed housing units at more than 1,000 private sites, allowing residents to be closer to their damaged homes while making needed repairs.
  • Commercial Sites – FEMA leased space and is housing approximately 250 households at the following sites: Holiday Village, Gulli’s, Burlington, Jefferson and Gold Nugget mobile home parks.
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