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Emergency Management and the Use of Social MediaThursday, January 5, 2012 - agrandon

MIDLOTHIAN, Va. -- Survivors of the Aug 23 earthquake from the City of Fredericksburg, and the counties of Culpeper, Fluvanna, Goochland, Orange, Spotsylvania and Louisa are eligible for Individual Assistance (IA). How can people in these locations find the information they need? One way is through social media.

The Virginia Department of Emergency Management (VDEM) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) maintain Facebook, Twitter and YouTube sites. These sites contain updates in the form of news, information and videos on disaster recovery and information on preparing for the next time disaster strikes.

"Events worldwide have demonstrated how quickly social media can connect people and allow them to share information and help one another," said Federal Coordinating Officer Don Keldsen. "We have been able to reach the survivors of disasters through our continued posting to social media websites such as twitter and facebook."

"When the earthquake hit on Aug 23, cell phone service was not available," said State Coordinating Officer Michael Cline. "Many turned to facebook and twitter to communicate with their family and friends."

VDEM and FEMA want to encourage anyone who uses personal computers or smartphones to stay up to date by accessing the following social media sites:

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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Helpful Hints on How to Spot Earthquake DamageThursday, November 17, 2011 - agrandon

MIDLOTHIAN, Va. -- Often earthquake damage can mimic plain old wear and tear or be so subtle it's hard to find, say officials of the Virginia Department of Emergency Management (VDEM) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

Although a magnitude 5.8 earthquake struck Louisa County on August 23 and was followed by more than 40 subsequent aftershocks as large as magnitude 4.5, much of the damage is not easy to find. But find it we must because this "hidden" damage can present major safety or building hazards and needs to be detected and repaired.

"We urge anyone who thinks their property was damaged by the quake to call 1-800-621 FEMA (3362) or 1-800-462-7585 (TTY) to register for assistance," said Federal Coordinating Officer Don Keldsen of the FEMA. "We'll send out an inspector who can identify earthquake damage."

State and federal officials suggest homeowners in Louisa County take a walk around the inside and outside of their property and check for damage.

"Taking the simple steps below will help you identify earthquake damage," Keldsen added. "Not all damage appears immediately following the quake."

Taking the simple steps below will help you spot any earthquake damage.

  • Examine the entire outside of the structure for collapse or obvious movement off the foundation.
  • Check the ground for fissures or areas where the ground may have shifted. Are there any breaks in fence lines or other structures that might indicate nearby damage?
  • Does the building look crooked or out of plumb?
  • Is the floor or roof pulling away or separated from the building supports?
  • Does the floor feel "bouncy", "soggy" or "mushy" when you walk on it? This may indicate damage under the floor.
  • Has anything fallen off the chimney or parapet? Are there any signs of cracks in the chimney's mortar? Such cracks can be fire hazards or allow deadly carbon monoxide to leak into the house.
  • To ensure your safety, have a certified chimney inspector evaluate your chimney. Contact your insurance company, mortgage company, or the Chimney Safety Institute of America (www.CSIA.org).
  • Inspect stairs for stability. If they were solid before the earthquake, and now they wobble when you walk on them, they may be a hazard. Are the banister and supporting columns secure?
  • Are any windows or doors newly jammed or blocked? Can you easily raise and lower windows, or have they become difficult to move since the quake? Do all doors open and close without resistance?
  • Look in the crawl spaces, stairwells, basements, attics and other exposed areas for signs of damage such as exposed or cracked beams, roof leaks, and foundation cracks.
  • Check basement floors and exterior walls for cracks and bulges that may indicate more serious problems.
  • Look for damage to ceilings, partitions, light fixtures, the roof, fuel tanks, and other attachments to the main frame of the structure.
  • Check your furnace and hot water heater connections to make sure they are tight and not leaking.
  • Check for sewage and water line damage. If you suspect sewage lines are damaged, avoid using the toilets and call a plumber. If you are on "city water" and the water pipes are damaged, contact the water company and avoid using water from the tap. If you have a well and suspect damage to the well or pipes, do not use the water and call a well company. You can obtain safe water from undamaged water heaters or by melting ice cubes.
  • Are there new or bigger cracks in the drywall, stucco or plaster? Does the drywall have "stair step" cracks-a clear indicator of earthquake damage? Check closely around windows and doorframes for radiating cracks, the most common site of cracks from earthquakes.

The FEMA toll-free telephone registration number, 1-800-621-FEMA or 1-800-462-7585 (TTY), operates from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. seven days a week.

Available assistance includes grants to help pay for temporary housing, emergency home repairs and other serious disaster-related expenses. Aid also may include U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) low-interest loans for homeowners, renters, businesses of all sizes and non-profit organizations.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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What You Can Do to Prepare for the Next Storm or FloodFriday, October 21, 2011 - agrandon

HARRISBURG, Pa. -- Heavy rains and flooding can occur anytime. Officials recommend that Pennsylvania residents prepare now for the next storm or flood. According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), some simple actions can be taken to lower your chances of flood property losses and to make sure your family is safe.

Creating and Keeping Records Safe

Create a file with your personal information in it. Keep the information in a safe deposit box or in a waterproof container in your home. The file should contain:

  • Life and property insurance policies and your agent's contact information.
  • A copy of your deed if you own real estate.
  • Financial records and bank account numbers.
  • An inventory of your possessions.
  • Photographs of each room and its contents.
  • Critical documents such as wills, trusts, and medical directives.

Preparing Your Home:

  • Keep your sump pump in good working order.
  • Clean out debris from gutters and downspouts regularly so rain water can flow through.
  • Keep fuel tanks anchored to prevent them from floating away and possibly causing harm.
  • Raise electrical items such as switches, circuit breakers, and wiring at least 12 inches above the point you think floodwaters might reach.
  • If possible, raise the furnace, water heater, washer, and dryer onto cement blocks at least 12 inches above the point you expect flood water might reach.

Safeguarding your Family:

  • Make a safety kit with a 3 day supply of drinking water and canned food, a can opener, first aid items, blankets, a National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) radio, and a flashlight with batteries.
  • Put emergency contact telephone numbers by each phone, program them into your cell phones, post them on the refrigerator and teach your children how to dial 911.
  • Know your community's evacuation plan and practice the flood evacuation route with your family. Find safe routes from home, work and school-those on higher ground.
  • Ask an out-of-state relative or friend to be the contact for your family in case of an emergency.
  • Make plans to protect and care for your pets.
  • Purchase flood insurance. When the next flood comes you will be glad you have an insurance settlement to help you recover from any losses you have. To find the agent closest to you, go to www.floodsmart.gov and enter your address.

For more information on emergency preparations visit Ready.gov or www.DisasterAssistance.gov, or call FEMA's Helpline at 1-800-621-FEMA (3362) between 7 a.m. and 10 p.m. daily. Those with speech or hearing impairments may call TTY 1-800-462-7585. If you use 711 or Video Relay Service (VRS), call 1-800-621-3362. Operators are multilingual and calls are answered seven days a week from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. You also can register online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov or by smart phone or tablet at m.fema.gov. If you have a disability and need help registering, please don't hesitate to contact FEMA to ask for help.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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The National Flood Insurance Program Plays an Important Role in Disaster Relief Wednesday, October 19, 2011 - agrandon

HARRISBURG, Pa. -- The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) plays a key role along with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in helping individuals recover from Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee. In just one month after the storms devastated Pennsylvania, the NFIP paid $34 million in insurance claims for disaster losses.

The NFIP does not wait for a full estimate of damages to begin to settle claims according to Rich Sobota, the NFIP representative in Pennsylvania.

"We want to allow people to begin to repair and rebuild as soon as we have an estimate of their damage," Sobota said. "Nobody knows until we have a final estimate how much damage there is, but 10 to 15 days after the losses are reviewed, we may be able to give a partial payment to the claimant."

In fact, $27.6 million in advance or partial payments has been made to the insured. Sobota said if the insured discovers more damage after receiving a payout on the original estimate, NFIP will increase the dollar amount for eligible losses.

The maximum grant from FEMA to cover all disaster related losses is $30,200 and the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) offers low interest disaster loans, but they must be repaid. Insurance is an important part of a disaster survivors' recovery, PEMA and FEMA officials say. An NFIP policy can be purchased for as little as $129.00 a year. For more information about the NFIP and flood insurance call 1-800-427-4661 or contact your insurance company or agent. You can also get information online at www.fema.gov/business/nfip.

To register for disaster assistance with FEMA, call 1-800-621-3362 or TTY 1-800-462-7585. If you use 711 or Video Relay Service (VRS), call 1-800-621-3362. Operators are multilingual and calls are answered seven days a week from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. You also can register online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov or by smart phone or tablet at m.fema.gov. If you have a disability and need help registering, please don't hesitate to contact FEMA to ask for help.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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Be Flood Smart; Buy Flood InsuranceWednesday, October 19, 2011 - agrandon

MIDLOTHIAN, Va. -- Savvy Virginians know how to protect their homes from the country’s #1 natural disaster: buy flood insurance.

“Flooding is the most common disaster in this country, but homeowner’s insurance rarely covers flood damage,” said the Federal Emergency Management Agency's Federal Coordinating Officer Don Keldsen.

“All it takes is a few inches of water to cause major damage to your home,” said Virginia Department of Emergency Management’s State Coordinating Officer Michael Cline. “Flood insurance is a low-cost way of protecting yourself and your property from harm,” he said.

The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is backed by the federal government, but policies are sold by private insurance agents throughout Virginia. Homeowners, businesses and renters can purchase flood insurance as long as their community participates in the program.

Today 21,564 communities nationwide participate in NFIP; 283 of them are in Virginia. Only 17 communities in Virginia have yet to join the program. To join, a community must adopt and administer flood hazard regulations. To see a list of participating Virginia communities, go to www.fema.gov/fema/csb.

Flood insurance pays off.

Homes in high risk areas, have a 1 in 4 chance of flooding during a 30-year mortgage. As a result, many borrowers in high-risk areas are required to buy flood insurance. But flooding can happen anywhere. In fact, nearly 20 percent of flood insurance claims come from moderate to low risk areas.

The average homeowner pays about $600 a year for flood insurance. NFIP flood insurance can be purchased for as little as $129 a year for a home in a low risk area. Costs increase significantly in high risk zones.

Coverage can include up to $250,000 for the structure up to $100,000 for its contents. For businesses, structural coverage is available up to $500,000, and up to $500,000 for contents.

Flood insurance is not dependent upon a federal disaster declaration. NFIP pays claims even if a disaster is not declared by the president. Less than half of the floods in the U.S. result in a federal disaster declaration.

Since 1973, the NFIP has paid nearly $40 billion dollars in flood insurance claims, helping hundreds of thousands of families and businesses recover from flood events. Even after a home, apartment, or business has been flooded, owners and renters are still eligible to purchase flood insurance, provided that the community is participating in the NFIP.

Be flood smart. Buy flood insurance. Remember: It takes 30 days after purchase for flood insurance to go into effect. Act now.

Go to www.floodsmart.gov to find out more.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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Chesapeake Mitigation Programs Reduce Hurricane Damage Wednesday, October 19, 2011 - agrandon

MIDLOTHIAN, Va. -- When Hurricane Irene swept into Chesapeake, Va. Aug. 27, the city was ready, thanks to an active citizenry and mitigation grants from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

“We can’t control Mother Nature, but we can prepare,” said State Coordinating Officer Michael Cline of the Virginia Department of Emergency Management. “What we learn from the city of Chesapeake can be applied throughout Virginia.”

“Over the years, Chesapeake has used FEMA mitigation grants to protect the community from future damage,” said Federal Coordinating Officer Don Keldsen. “That is what mitigation is all about.”

As Hurricane Irene approached, Chesapeake officials did not issue mandatory evacuation orders, but encouraged people in flood-prone areas or living in mobile homes to leave. They opened four emergency shelters plus one for pets to serve evacuees.

Fourteen thousand residents got the word through the Chesapeake Alert System. Developed in 2009, the system can send voice and/or text messages to registered residents. The city’s Natural Event Mitigation Advisory Committee developed the system for just $2,915, funded by a grant from FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP).

Since it was established, the system has significantly decreased the amount of personal property damage in the city from all levels of flooding. The city also uses the system to send non-emergency information on disaster planning, post-event notifications, and town hall meeting announcements.

The advisory committee has been working since 2003 to develop and monitor effective mitigation strategies. Made up of private citizens and city staff, the committee was instrumental in creating the city’s Hazard Mitigation Plan. Today it reviews all plan updates and initiates mitigation projects.

There are about 11,000 properties in the City of Chesapeake floodplain. Over the years, the city and the committee have successfully targeted properties with repetitive losses. For example, the city:

  • Distributed a brochure to floodplain residents that described simple flood mitigation actions. The brochure also explained how to register for the alert system.
  • Purchased 160 NOAA weather radios to alert citizens in the most vulnerable neighborhoods to weather warning. This project cost $5,225 and was also funded with HMGP grants.
  • Encouraged residents to participate in the National Flood Insurance Program. At the time Irene hit, about 80 percent of flood-damaged buildings were covered by flood insurance.
  • Added “freeboard” and/or flood proofing requirements to its floodplain management regulations. Freeboard means the level that a structure’s lowest floor must be elevated. Freeboard reduces flood damage and lowers flood insurance rates.
  • Elevated four flood-prone properties using the HMGP. The four elevated houses stayed high and dry during the last six significant flood events, including Hurricane Irene.
  • Purchased five flood-prone properties using FEMA’s Repetitive Flood Claims (RFC) grant program. These properties will always be maintained as open green space.

All these mitigation measures contribute to the safety of Chesapeake’s citizens and reduce the damage caused by the area’s weather events.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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Federal Aid Programs for District of Columbia Disaster RecoveryWednesday, September 28, 2011 - agrandon
Following is a summary of key federal disaster aid programs that can be made available as needed and warranted under President Obama's major disaster declaration issued for the District of Columbia.

Assistance for District and Affected Local Governments Can Include as Required:
•Payment of not less than 75 percent of the eligible costs for repairing or replacing damaged public facilities, such as roads, bridges, utilities, buildings, schools, recreational areas and similar publicly owned property, as well as certain private non-profit organizations engaged in community service activities. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)
•Payment of not more than 75 percent of the approved costs for hazard mitigation projects undertaken by district and local governments to prevent or reduce long-term risk to life and property from natural or technological disasters. (Source: FEMA funded, state administered.)

How to Apply for Assistance:
•Application procedures for local governments will be explained at a series of federal/district applicant briefings with locations to be announced in the affected area by recovery officials. Approved public repair projects are paid through the district from funding provided by FEMA and other participating federal agencies.

Follow FEMA online at blog.fema.gov, www.twitter.com/fema, www.facebook.com/fema, and www.youtube.com/fema. Also, follow Administrator Craig Fugate's activities at www.twitter.com/craigatfema.

The social media links provided are for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.
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President Declares Disaster For PennsylvaniaTuesday, September 13, 2011 - agrandon
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced that federal aid has been made available to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and ordered federal aid to supplement commonwealth and local recovery efforts in the area affected by Tropical Storm Lee beginning on September 3, 2011, and continuing.

The President's action makes federal funding available to affected individuals in the counties of Adams, Bradford, Columbia, Cumberland, Dauphin, Lancaster, Lebanon, Luzerne, Lycoming, Montour, Northumberland, Perry, Schuylkill, Snyder, Sullivan, Susquehanna, Union, Wyoming, and York.

Assistance can include grants for temporary housing and home repairs, low-cost loans to cover uninsured or underinsured property losses, and other programs to help individuals and business owners recover from the effects of the disaster.

Federal funding is also available on a cost-sharing basis for hazard mitigation measures for all counties within the commonwealth.

Thomas J. McCool has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for Federal recovery operations in the affected area. McCool said that damage surveys are continuing in other areas, and additional counties may be designated for assistance after the assessments are fully completed.

Individuals and business owners who sustained losses in the designated counties can begin applying for assistance by registering online at http://www.disasterassistance.gov, by web enabled mobile device at m.fema.gov or by calling 1-800-621-FEMA (3362). Disaster assistance applicants, who have a speech disability or hearing loss and use TTY, should call 1-800-462-7585 directly; for those who use 711 or Video Relay Service (VRS), call 1-800-621-3362. The toll-free telephone numbers will operate from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. (local time) seven days a week until further notice.

Follow FEMA online at blog.fema.gov, www.twitter.com/fema, www.facebook.com/fema, and www.youtube.com/fema. Also, follow Administrator Craig Fugate's activities at www.twitter.com/craigatfema.

The social media links provided are for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications.

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.
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President Declares Emergency For PennsylvaniaTuesday, August 30, 2011 - agrandon

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced that federal aid has been made available to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to supplement the commonwealth and local response efforts due to the emergency conditions resulting from Hurricane Irene beginning on August 26, 2011, and continuing.

The President's action authorizes the Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), to coordinate all disaster relief efforts which have the purpose of alleviating the hardship and suffering caused by the emergency on the local population, and to provide appropriate assistance for required emergency measures, authorized under Title V of the Stafford Act, to save lives and to protect property and public health and safety, and to lessen or avert the threat of a catastrophe for Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Lehigh, Luzerne, Monroe, Montgomery, Northampton, Philadelphia, Pike, Sullivan, Wayne, and Wyoming counties. Specifically, FEMA is authorized to identify, mobilize, and provide at its discretion, equipment and resources necessary to alleviate the impacts of the emergency.  Emergency protective measures, limited to direct federal assistance, will be provided at 75 percent federal funding. 

Ed Smith has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area.  

Follow FEMA online at blog.fema.govwww.twitter.com/femawww.facebook.com/fema, andwww.youtube.com/fema.  Also, follow Administrator Craig Fugate's activities at www.twitter.com/craigatfema

The social media links provided are for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications. 

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Hits: 1379 

President Declares Emergency For DelawareSunday, August 28, 2011 - agrandon

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced that federal aid has been made available to the State of Delaware to supplement state and local response efforts in the area due to the emergency conditions resulting from Hurricane Irene beginning on August 26, 2011, and continuing.

The President's action authorizes the Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), to coordinate all disaster relief efforts which have the purpose of alleviating the hardship and suffering caused by the emergency on the local population, and to provide appropriate assistance for required emergency measures, authorized under Title V of the Stafford Act, to save lives and to protect property and public health and safety, and to lessen or avert the threat of a catastrophe in the entire state. 
Specifically, FEMA is authorized to identify, mobilize, and provide at its discretion, equipment and resources necessary to alleviate the impacts of the emergency.  Emergency protective measures, including direct federal assistance, will be provided at 75 percent federal funding. 

Regis Leo Phelan has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area. 

Follow FEMA online at http://blog.fema.gov, www.twitter.com/fema, www.facebook.com/fema, and www.youtube.com/fema.  Also, follow Administrator Craig Fugate's activities at www.twitter.com/craigatfema.

The social media links provided are for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications. 

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Hits: 1330 

President Declares Emergency For The District Of ColumbiaSunday, August 28, 2011 - agrandon

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced that federal aid has been made available to the District of Columbia to supplement district response efforts in the area due to the emergency conditions resulting from Hurricane Irene beginning on August 26, 2011, and continuing.

The President's action authorizes the Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), to coordinate all disaster relief efforts which have the purpose of alleviating the hardship and suffering caused by the emergency on the local population, and to provide appropriate assistance for required emergency measures, authorized under Title V of the Stafford Act, to save lives and to protect property and public health and safety, and to lessen or avert the threat of a catastrophe in the District of Columbia.    

Specifically, FEMA is authorized to identify, mobilize, and provide at its discretion, equipment and resources necessary to alleviate the impacts of the emergency.  Emergency protective measures, including direct federal assistance, will be provided at 75 percent federal funding. 

Kim Kadesch has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area. 

Follow FEMA online at http://blog.fema.gov, www.twitter.com/fema, www.facebook.com/fema, and www.youtube.com/fema.  Also, follow Administrator Craig Fugate's activities at www.twitter.com/craigatfema.

The social media links provided are for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications. 

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Hits: 1359 

President Declares Emergency For MarylandSaturday, August 27, 2011 - agrandon

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced that federal aid has been made available to State of Maryland to supplement the state and local response efforts in the area due to the emergency conditions resulting from Hurricane Irene beginning on August 26, 2011, and continuing.

The President's action authorizes the Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), to coordinate all disaster relief efforts which have the purpose of alleviating the hardship and suffering caused by the emergency on the local population, and to provide appropriate assistance for required emergency measures, authorized under Title V of the Stafford Act, to save lives and to protect property and public health and safety, and to lessen or avert the threat of a catastrophe in the counties of Baltimore, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne’s, Somerset, Talbot, Wicomico, Worcester, and Baltimore City.

Specifically, FEMA is authorized to identify, mobilize, and provide at its discretion, equipment and resources necessary to alleviate the impacts of the emergency.  Emergency protective measures, including direct federal assistance, will be provided at 75 percent federal funding. 

Thomas J. McCool has been named as the Federal Coordinating Officer for federal recovery operations in the affected area.  

Follow FEMA online at blog.fema.govwww.twitter.com/femawww.facebook.com/fema, andwww.youtube.com/fema.  Also, follow Administrator Craig Fugate's activities at www.twitter.com/craigatfema

The social media links provided are for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications. 

FEMA's mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Hits: 1360 

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